Sociable

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Jackson Highway return to Muscle Shoals


Jackson Highway return to Muscle Shoals


Alabama Music Office.com goes to PJ's in Muscle Shoals, Alabama to attend the "Asphalt" Tour 2012 performance of Jackson Highway.

Jackson Highway was named by Muscle Shoals producer
Jimmy Johnson after the legendary address of the Muscle Shoals Sound Recording
Studio in Sheffield, Alabama....3614 Jackson Highway. With that name the band
certainly became a part of  a special musical family.

The founding members of the band, brothers, Dennis and Russell Gulley, along with
friend, Tommy Patterson, migrated from Fort Payne, Alabama to the Shoals after
several years of working on the road with both regional and national acts, such as
Cross from Birmingham and Ruby Winters (Polydor Records  recording artist). The
Gulley brothers came out of a background of Southern Gospel music, while Patterson
was a music student in college. All were searching for a future in music as artists
and /or songwriters.

Shortly after getting to Muscle Shoals Sound, the trio was joined  by guitarist Britt
Meacham, and drummer, Ronnie Vance, a native of Florence, Alabama. Britt was a
native of  Memphis, but had settled in Mobile, Alabama with his new wife, Cheryl.
Britt had previously worked with Bell Records recording act, Storm, a rock trio
produced by Barry Beckett at MSS (Muscle Shoals Sound).

Mike O'rear, the publishing administrator for MSS, was put in charge of demoing the
new arrivals for the publishing company and became instrumental in supporting the
band members by getting them a house band gig across the Ala.Tenn. state line at a
club called Johnny's Club. The band worked there from 1973 till about 1977, when
they released their first LP on the Muscle Shoals Sound label, simply titled ,
"Jackson Highway".

With the release of their first recording, Jackson Highway  began a hard  journey that
kept them constantly touring throughout the South , colleges, clubs, concert dates,
where ever anyone would listen to them.

In 1980, their hard work finally paid off with a second LP, produced by the same
MSS team of Jimmy Johnson and David Hood. This time the LP was on the
MSS/Capitol label. To support the record, the band toured with Ted Nugent, UFO,
Triumph, and opened for groups, such as Blackfoot.

When Capitol, did not pick up the band's option, the group then moved to Nashville,
at the suggestion of hometown friends, the Country Supergroup, ALABAMA. This
time, keyboardist, Tommy Patterson chose to stay in Muscle Shoals to do sessions
and work for the recording studios.

In 1986, after some 13 years together, the band  officially disbanded. Since then, the
various members have remained in touch, even performing with each other on
occasion, and each continues to maintain a musical career.

Dennis, lives in Nashville, manages a recording studio with partner, Johnny Neel,
formerly of The Allman Brothers and Gov't Mule, and performs at Nashville clubs.
He's also toured with ALABAMA and  The Moffits.

Tommy Patterson is still in Muscle Shoals, works at the recording studios in
computer programming, piano tuning, and sessions, gigs locally as well as on the
road, with such stars as the legendary, Little Richard.

Britt Meacham, lives in Mobile and tours/records regularly with Malaco/Waldoxy
Records group, The Beat Daddys. Britt has also toured overseas with Blues Legend,
Little Milton. Of course Britt is also famous for supplying some famous guitar licks
on the giant rock and roll recording by Bob Seger, Old Time Rock and Roll.

Russell Gulley continues to perform and record. He,also is involved with the arts
community as a folklorist and community arts administrator. He serves on the board
of the Alabama Folklife Association, is active in arts in education programming, and
has served his hometown of Fort Payne, as one of the organizers of an annual
festival, The Boom Days Heritage Celebration.

Ronnie Vance, still resides in Florence, where he is a successful businessman and
entrepreneur.

Bad Brad and The Sipsey Slims "Possum Bit"


Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims "Possum Bit"

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Rogue Tavern in downtown Birmingham, Alabama to attend a performance by Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. "Possum Bit" is one of their most requested songs.


Brad Guin of Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims

Brad Guin aka Bad Brad is an old road dog that paid his dues for over 20 years playing sideman and studio musician for such acts as Eddie Floyd, Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, The Temptations, Paul Shaffer, Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit, The Four Tops, The O'Jays, Greg Allman, Little Milton, Clarence Carter, Buddy Miles, Percy Sledge, Dr. Hook, Tony Joe White, Bonnie Bramlett, T. Graham Brown, Jimmy Hall, Martha and the Vandellas, Fame Studios, Muscle Shoals Sound Studios Horn Section, The Nutt House Studios Horn Section, Emerald Studios, Travis Wammack, Jimmie Johnson, Rick Hall, Wayne Perkins, The Decoys, Jim Nabors, Cornell Dupree, The Muscle Shoals Horns, The Tuscaloosa Horns, The North Mississippi All Stars, David Kimbrough, Musical Fantasy, Rick Carter's League of Legendary Artists (LOLA), Frankie Velvet and the Veltones, Erin Mitchell and many more, as well as many all-star special events bands such as The Alabama Music Hall of Fame Induction Band, The Muscle Shoals Soul Revue.

Brad has been there and done that as far as life in the music business goes. He has played with hundreds of bands at every possible level and in every scenario. His experience as a player is vast, and his education has come from the great legends of the music industry. Brad has played some of the most illustrious venues in the world: Austin City Limits, The Apollo Theatre, all the Blue Note Clubs in Japan, the star-studded opening of Euro Disney as well as more major festivals than can be remembered, plus the finest theaters and amphitheatres that each major city has to offer. Saying that he is a seasoned pro would be an understatement.

Brad has returned to Tuscaloosa, Alabama where it all began for him. His return brought time to perfect his songwriting. "I consider songwriting to be as much of who I am as my ability as a player. It's as much of who I am, if not more," says Brad. "I love telling stories. I always wanted to cut a record of original material, but I had envisioned a far more instrumental endeavor for one reason. I did not know I could sing. I had no idea. I only started experiencing it after being around Bobby Whitlock, keyboard for Derek & The Dominoes. We would be hanging out drinking coffee, he would sing, and it would come from his toenails. It was awesome. And it was nothing like his speaking voice. I would get in the car after hanging with him and try to do it. It took several years of 'doing it' before I would even attempt it in front of anyone."

"I had all these songs written, and nothing to do with them. I finally wanted to try my hand at producing. I called all my most bad-to-the-bone friends to do a session in the Shoals: Buster Marbury (Grammy award-winning producer and drummer for The Temptations, who flew in from Detroit), Jason Isbell, Ken Waters, Jimbo Hart of the 400 Unit, Greg Lowery, Scott Boyer III, Shane Porter, Chris Gordon, Chad Fisher and Dan Western. I traded a Fender Rhodes piano to my friend Jimmy Nutt for three days in his new Sheffield, Alabama studio, The Nutt House."

"When I cut the vocals, it shocked everyone that knows me, and it has been a wonderful experience arguing with everyone that knows me that it really is me singing on the album. It's Jim Nabors syndrome, because I am country as a turnip green, and I sing like an old black man. That comes from years of passionately listening to Stax, Muscle Shoals, High Records, Motown, Ray Charles, the Philadelphia stuff, the Macon, Georgia stuff and piles of New Orleans music. I can't sing white unless it's country-oriented."

"I grew up so very country on the edge of the Sipsey Swamp. Across the cotton field from my house, bluegrass raged every weekend at least one night if not two, and sometimes all daylong. So, my influences are a culmination of all things southern."
Brad has always had a passion for music. He learned to play the saxophone in the band at Northside High School. He had an excellent band instructor, Roger Mills, who directly and indirectly inspired him to play his sax 7 to 10 hours a day. He and Roger are still friends. Roger now owns Cole Band Instruments in Northport, Alabama. Brad followed his music path to the University of North Alabama where session work soon became plentiful. Then came the life of a sideman on the road. He has come full circle now and has the chops to do what ever he wants. What he wants is to play you his songs that he does so very, very well. Folks, look back over the list of super pros Brad has played for. It stands to reason that over that time Brad became a pro. In other words, he is a 'bad' sax player. Truth be known, Brad Guin just might be the baddest of the baddest. You owe it to yourself and Southern music in general to experience, Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. Yep, Bad 'Bama' Brad Guin is an Alabama frontman to watch.

Published-Tannehill Trader December 2012












Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa, Ala #10


Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa, Ala #10


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the historic Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama to attend the Alabama Blues Project Benefit performances by Wet Willie and Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims.

In this video "Leona" is asked if she wants to be my honey child....

Wet Willie hits Bama Theatre for Alabama Blues Project benefit
By Mark Hughes Cobb
Tusk Editor
Published: Friday, September 7, 2012 at 3:30 a.m.

The blues has a range wider than three major chords and a good man feeling bad. Most people who say they play blues really mix in a combo platter of soul, R&B and other sounds, like Brad Guin, the sax man from north Tuscaloosa County. Guin has put together tonight's show featuring classic-rock-blues-soul-R&B band Wet Willie and his own original music project, Bad Brad and the Sipsey Slims.

"I'm a coordinator for the Alabama Blues Project, so they told me, 'Let's do something big,' " Guin said. "I got to thinking about who I'd like to do a show with it, somebody who hadn't been here in a long time."

Guin played in the Alabama Music Hall of Fame band when that group inducted Jimmy Hall, front man for Wet Willie as lead singer. Like Guin, Hall plays sax when he's not singing, in addition to harmonica.

"We called 'em and got it going on. They've been playing all around — Mobile, Atlanta, Nashville — but nobody's booked 'em here. For an Alabama band, they don't play in Alabama all that much," Guin said.

Wet Willie came out of Mobile in the '70s. Throughout that decade, Wet Willie cut high-energy, funky Southern rock for Capricorn Records, along with a greatest hits disc for Polydor and a couple of studio albums for Epic. The band's biggest hit was the infectious "Keep on Smilin'," but they also charted and found airply with "Country Side of Life," "Leona," "Dixie Rock," "Everything That 'Cha Do (Will Come Back to You)," "Street Corner Serenade" and "Weekend." The 1973 live album "Drippin' Wet" was one of those live discs that everyone seemed to own on 8-track.

Their recording schedule dropped off after the '80s, when Hall went out on more solo work, recording with members of the Allman Brothers Band and the Rolling Stones, and adding vocals to guitar wizard Jeff Beck's 1986 disc "Flash," for which he was Grammy nominated. Hall has also perfomed as bandleader, vocalist, saxophonist and harmonica player for Hank Williams Jr., with Stevie Ray Vaughan's old band Double Trouble, and his own groups Prisoners of Love and Deep South. In 2007, Hall cut a tribute to the late Tuscaloosa-born singer-songwriter Eddie Hinton, called "Build Your Own Fire," featuring Muscle Shoals musicians and guest vocalist Delbert McClinton.

Monday, November 26, 2012

Elvis Lives


Video-Elvis Lives

Alabama Music Office.com pays tribute to the iconic Elvis. Many sightings have been made over the last few decades especially in and around Buhl, Alabama. This video will attest to the fact that Elvis is everywhere!

Thursday, November 22, 2012

An Alabama pickin' featuring steel guitars



An Alabama pickin' featuring steel guitars

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Cottondale Methodist Church near Tuscaloosa, Alabama for a pickin' featuring some of the best string pluckers ever assembled.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Bad Brad "Trash Talkin' Lolita"





Alabama Music Office.com goes to Rogue Tavern in downtown Birmingham, Alabama for a performance by Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. This is a band of professionals that is making a name for themselves one gig at a time. These guys are where Southern music is today.

For 20 years, Brad Guin has covered every pig trail in the U.S. and abroad as a burning sideman and studio musician, playing with such acts as Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, Greg Allman, The Temptations, The Four Tops, The O'Jays, Clarence Carter, Little Milton, Percy Sledge, Eddie Floyd, Johnny Taylor, Tony Joe White, Bobby Whitlock, T. Graham Brown, Martha and the Vandellas, Travis Wammack, Rick Carter and the League of Legendary Artists, Cornell Dupree, Dennis Edwards, Jim Nabors, Freddy Hart, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Bonnie Bramlett, as well as many all-star special events bands such as The Alabama Music Hall of Fame Induction Band, The Muscle Shoals Soul Revue. He has played with hundreds of bands at every possible level and in every scenario. His experience as a player is vast, and his education has come from the great legends of the music industry.

Brad has played some of the most illustrious venues in the world: Austin City Limits, The Apollo Theatre, all the Blue Note Clubs in Japan, the star-studded opening of Euro Disney as well as more major festivals than you can shake a stick at, plus the finest theaters and amphitheatres that each major city has to offer. That was as a saxophone player.

To say the very least, he is a seasoned pro. As well as being a ringer musician, he is also a songwriter who considers that to be as much of who he is as his ability as a player.

"It's as much of who I am, if not more," says Brad. "I love telling stories.

In Brad's Words:

I always wanted to cut a record of original material, but I had envisioned a far more instrumental endeavor for one reason. I did not know I could sing. I had know idea. I only started experiencing it after being around Bobby Whitlock, keyboard for Derek & The Dominoes. We would be hanging out drinking coffee, he would sing, and it would come from his toenails. It was awesome. And it was nothing like his speaking voice. I would get in the car after hanging with him and try to do it. It took several years of "doing it" before I would even attempt it in front of anyone.

I had all these songs written, and nothing to do with them. I finally wanted to try my hand at producing. I called all my most bad-to-the-bone friends to do a session in the Shoals: Buster Marbury (Grammy award-winning producer and drummer for The Temptations, who flew in from Detroit), Jason Isbell, Ken Waters, Jimbo Hart of the 400 Unit, Greg Lowery, Scott Boyer III, Shane Porter, Chris Gordon, Chad Fisher and Dan Western. I traded a Fender Rhodes piano to my friend Jimmy Nutt for three days in his new Sheffield, Alabama studio, The Nutt House.

Buster Marbury heard me fooling aroung singing. He said, "You need to do that, man. You got something."

Buster passed away from cancer a short time later, but he put a seed in my head, otherwise I doubt I would have even attempted it. The whole voice thing would have never happened without Bobby Whitlock or Buster Marbury. I was so shy and secretive about developing it that my own wife and child had no idea. Nobody knew it, and it was literally many years after my time with Bobby and Buster that I hooked up with the guys in the Slims to cut the record that anyone knew about my singing.

When I cut the vocals, it shocked everyone that knows me, and it has been a wonderful experience arguing with everyone that knows me that it really is me singing on the album. It's Jim Nabors syndrome, because I am country as a turnip green, and I sing like an old black man. That comes from years of passionately listening to Stax, Muscle Shoals, High Records, Motown, Ray Charles, the Philadelphia stuff, the Macon, Georgia stuff and piles of New Orleans music. I can't sing white unless it's country-oriented.

At which point my bluegrass roots and old gospel roots come out, as well as my love of Ray Stevens and Jerry Reed. I grew up so very country on the edge of the Sipsey Swamp. Across the cotton field from my house, bluegrass raged every weekend at least one night if not two, and sometimes all day long. So, my influences are a culmination of all things southern.

Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa, Ala #9


Wet Willie "Lucy Was In Trouble"


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama for performances by Wet Willie and Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims playing for the Alabama Blues Project Benefit.

Wet Willie hits Bama Theatre for Alabama Blues Project Benefit
By Mark Hughes Cobb
Tusk Editor
Published: Friday, September 7, 2012

The blues has a range wider than three major chords and a good man feeling bad. Most people who say they play blues really mix in a combo platter of soul, R&B and other sounds, like Brad Guin, the sax man from north Tuscaloosa County. Guin has put together tonight's show featuring classic-rock-blues-soul-R&B band Wet Willie and his own original music project, Bad Brad and the Sipsey Slims.

"I'm a coordinator for the Alabama Blues Project, so they told me, 'Let's do something big,' " Guin said. "I got to thinking about who I'd like to do a show with it, somebody who hadn't been here in a long time."

Guin played in the Alabama Music Hall of Fame band when that group inducted Jimmy Hall, front man for Wet Willie as lead singer. Like Guin, Hall plays sax when he's not singing, in addition to harmonica.

"We called 'em and got it going on. They've been playing all around — Mobile, Atlanta, Nashville — but nobody's booked 'em here. For an Alabama band, they don't play in Alabama all that much," Guin said.

Wet Willie came out of Mobile in the '70s. Throughout that decade, Wet Willie cut high-energy, funky Southern rock for Capricorn Records, along with a greatest hits disc for Polydor and a couple of studio albums for Epic. The band's biggest hit was the infectious "Keep on Smilin'," but they also charted and found airply with "Country Side of Life," "Leona," "Dixie Rock," "Everything That 'Cha Do (Will Come Back to You)," "Street Corner Serenade" and "Weekend." The 1973 live album "Drippin' Wet" was one of those live discs that everyone seemed to own on 8-track.

Their recording schedule dropped off after the '80s, when Hall went out on more solo work, recording with members of the Allman Brothers Band and the Rolling Stones, and adding vocals to guitar wizard Jeff Beck's 1986 disc "Flash," for which he was Grammy nominated. Hall has also perfomed as bandleader, vocalist, saxophonist and harmonica player for Hank Williams Jr., with Stevie Ray Vaughan's old band Double Trouble, and his own groups Prisoners of Love and Deep South. In 2007, Hall cut a tribute to the late Tuscaloosa-born singer-songwriter Eddie Hinton, called "Build Your Own Fire," featuring Muscle Shoals musicians and guest vocalist Delbert McClinton.
Although he stays busy with those and other projects, Hall continues to front his friends and family — his brother Jack Hall plays bass, and their sister Donna Hall is one of the harmony singers — in Wet Willie.

"Jimmy Hall's voice gets better with age, which is crazy," Guin said. "He's just one of those rare cases."

The show, a benefit for the ABP's blues education after-school program, starts at 8:30, although doors to the Bama Theatre open at 7:30. Tickets are available online through Brown Paper Tickets for $25, or at the door of the Bama.

By Mark Hughes Cobb
Tusk Editor
Published: Friday, September 7, 2012 at 3:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 2:22 p.m.

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Bad Brad and The Sipsey Slims "Well Well Well"


Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Rogue Tavern in downtown Birmingham, Alabama for a performance by Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. This is a band of professionals that is making a name for themselves one gig at a time. These guys are where Southern music is today.

For 20 years, Brad Guin has covered every pig trail in the U.S. and abroad as a burning sideman and studio musician, playing with such acts as Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, Greg Allman, The Temptations, The Four Tops, The O'Jays, Clarence Carter, Little Milton, Percy Sledge, Eddie Floyd, Johnny Taylor, Tony Joe White, Bobby Whitlock, T. Graham Brown, Martha and the Vandellas, Travis Wammack, Rick Carter and the League of Legendary Artists, Cornell Dupree, Dennis Edwards, Jim Nabors, Freddy Hart, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Bonnie Bramlett, as well as many all-star special events bands such as The Alabama Music Hall of Fame Induction Band, The Muscle Shoals Soul Revue. He has played with hundreds of bands at every possible level and in every scenario. His experience as a player is vast, and his education has come from the great legends of the music industry.

Brad has played some of the most illustrious venues in the world: Austin City Limits, The Apollo Theatre, all the Blue Note Clubs in Japan, the star-studded opening of Euro Disney as well as more major festivals than you can shake a stick at, plus the finest theaters and amphitheatres that each major city has to offer. That was as a saxophone player.

To say the very least, he is a seasoned pro. As well as being a ringer musician, he is also a songwriter who considers that to be as much of who he is as his ability as a player.

"It's as much of who I am, if not more," says Brad. "I love telling stories.

In Brad's Words:

I always wanted to cut a record of original material, but I had envisioned a far more instrumental endeavor for one reason. I did not know I could sing. I had know idea. I only started experiencing it after being around Bobby Whitlock, keyboard for Derek & The Dominoes. We would be hanging out drinking coffee, he would sing, and it would come from his toenails. It was awesome. And it was nothing like his speaking voice. I would get in the car after hanging with him and try to do it. It took several years of "doing it" before I would even attempt it in front of anyone.

I had all these songs written, and nothing to do with them. I finally wanted to try my hand at producing. I called all my most bad-to-the-bone friends to do a session in the Shoals: Buster Marbury (Grammy award-winning producer and drummer for The Temptations, who flew in from Detroit), Jason Isbell, Ken Waters, Jimbo Hart of the 400 Unit, Greg Lowery, Scott Boyer III, Shane Porter, Chris Gordon, Chad Fisher and Dan Western. I traded a Fender Rhodes piano to my friend Jimmy Nutt for three days in his new Sheffield, Alabama studio, The Nutt House.

Buster Marbury heard me fooling aroung singing. He said, "You need to do that, man. You got something."

Buster passed away from cancer a short time later, but he put a seed in my head, otherwise I doubt I would have even attempted it. The whole voice thing would have never happened without Bobby Whitlock or Buster Marbury. I was so shy and secretive about developing it that my own wife and child had no idea. Nobody knew it, and it was literally many years after my time with Bobby and Buster that I hooked up with the guys in the Slims to cut the record that anyone knew about my singing.

When I cut the vocals, it shocked everyone that knows me, and it has been a wonderful experience arguing with everyone that knows me that it really is me singing on the album. It's Jim Nabors syndrome, because I am country as a turnip green, and I sing like an old black man. That comes from years of passionately listening to Stax, Muscle Shoals, High Records, Motown, Ray Charles, the Philadelphia stuff, the Macon, Georgia stuff and piles of New Orleans music. I can't sing white unless it's country-oriented.

At which point my bluegrass roots and old gospel roots come out, as well as my love of Ray Stevens and Jerry Reed. I grew up so very country on the edge of the Sipsey Swamp. Across the cotton field from my house, bluegrass raged every weekend at least one night if not two, and sometimes all day long. So, my influences are a culmination of all things southern.

Monday, November 12, 2012

Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa #8


Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa #8


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the historic Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama to see Wet Willie and Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims perform for The Alabama Blues Project Benefit September 2012.
Wet Willie is an American band from Mobile, Alabama, U.S. They were best known for their hit "Keep On Smilin'," reaching #10 on the Billboard Chart in August 1974, but had a number of charted songs in the 1970s utilizing their soulful brand of Southern rock.
Drummer Lewis Ross assembled the musicians for a group called "Fox" in the summer of 1969, which a year later became known as "Wet Willie."Wet Willie was a versatile, high-energy Southern rock band that, from 1971 until 1978, produced an array of albums awash in good-time music, rollicking high-energy blues-rock, and white Southern soul, but racked up just one Top Ten hit and a lot of admirers.
The core members of the band during that period were Jimmy Hall, vocals, harmonica, saxophone; Jimmy's brother Jack Hall on bass; John Anthony on keyboards; Ricky Hirsch on guitar, and Lewis Ross on drums and percussion. The duo of girls singing background vocals dubbed "The Williettes" were staple of the classic Wet Willie sound, and always featured Jimmy & Jack's sister, Donna Hall. Keyboardist Mike Duke also joined from The Wetter The Better LP onwards. For a short period of time in 1974 UK singer Elkie Brooks joined the band as a backing singer, as did future Honkette Leslie Hawkins.
Wet Willie put out several albums on Capricorn Records between 1971 and 1977. Along with a "Greatest Hits" album released on Polydor Records, they also released 2 more final studio albums on Epic Records, although some hits collections and further live recordings have been released as recently as 2006. Perhaps their best-known LP is the 1973 live album, Drippin' Wet, but their main claim to fame is the hit single, "Keep On Smilin,'" which reached #10 on the Billboard singles chart. They also enjoyed some other Billboard-charted songs with "Country Side Of Life," "Everything That 'Cha Do" (Will Come Back To You), "Leona," and from their Epic Records period, "Street Corner Serenade" and "Weekend" from the LP's Manorisms and Which One's Willie? They toured and recorded extensively from 1969 through the early Eighties, and they still perform today.
Wet Willie released a new live CD "Miles of Smiles" in 2012 and is touring with 4 original members, including original lead singer Jimmy Hall, brother Jack Hall on bass, sister Donna Hall on vocals and TK Lively on drums, as well as other long time members Ric Seymour on guitar and vocals, Ricky Chancey on guitar and newest member Bobby Mobley on keys.

Monday, November 5, 2012

Dick Cooper Party Aug 2008


Dick Cooper Party Aug 2008 for Michael Buffalo Smith

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoal Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend Dick Cooper's August 2008 Party for Michael Buffalo Smith. Always great fun, good food, killer music talent and a diverse mixture of music business folks from all over the state.

Sunday, November 4, 2012

Dick Cooper Party April 2008


Dick Cooper Party April 2008

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoal Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend Dick Cooper's Spring 2008 Party. Always a great time, always a different crowd, always a music centered happening. I will see you at the next one!