Sociable

Monday, December 31, 2012

Music at Dick Cooper ADAT Party 2012


Music at Dick Cooper ADAT Party 2012


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoal Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend the Dick Cooper ADAT (ADAT=Annual-Day-After-Thanksgiving) Party 2012. Parties can happen any time of the year at Dick Cooper's home overlooking beautiful Shoal Creek. Dick Cooper's Parties revolve around music and all aspects there of.
This video contains only a few that participated this day. This is the video with Johnny Wyker! Taylor Hoch, Tosha Hill & Zac Hacker, The Pyles and a unknown angry young man in the studio.

The Pyles at Dick Cooper Party


The Pyles at Dick Cooper Party

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoals Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend the Dick Cooper Annual-Day-After-Thanksgiving Party. This is a gathering of folks with only music and humanity as common interest.

Look out world, here come The Pyles. Fresh out of Muscle Shoals, Alabama enters this dynamic duo. The Pyles are; W. Cullen Stewart, of Killen, Alabama, and Jessica Rothstein, of Philadelphia, PA. These two handsome young performers are setting the world aflame with their fresh, new, exciting and unique combination of ukuleles, yes UKULELES, with Cullen often laying down his ukulele and picking up the mandolin as well. This combination, which combined with Jess's ukulele, and then backed by some of the most professional and gifted Shoals area and Nashville musicians you can find.

Their exciting, toe-tapping music brings the crowds to their feet, unable to stay off the dance floor when they are on stage "laying it down," as they say in the world of music. Cullen's remarkable song writing, at times with Jess adding her lyrical contributions, has made them the most sought after duo in the country today. Produced and Engineered by veteran record men Jerry Masters and Jimmie Nutt at the Nutt House, in Sheffield, AL, this record is destined to be a big seller to all sorts of genres and musical aficionados.

Cullen, birthed into this world with a musical mother, the former Jan Stevenson, of Florence, Alabama. Jan was born and raised in the Shoals area for a big part of her life, going to high school at Roger's High in Greenhill, AL. The East Hill neighborhood in Florence, Alabama,where Jan spent her childhood, along with Shoals greats Donnie Fritts, Junior Lowe, and the late session guitarist Terry Thompson, set the stage for her love for Muscle Shoals music from a very early age. Her love for these sounds, combined with Cullen's desire to follow in the footsteps of the funky music he had grown up listening to, has made him one of the most prolific songwriters, singers and musicians on the scene today. Add Jess' unusual, yet effective harmonies, and you have something that simply, WORKS.

You will enjoy Cullen's young trek through life through his songs, reflecting the good times as well as the bad. Along with life's painful experiences, coupled with seasons of joy, and disappointments, has taught him the ways of simple survival. These learned lessons are then put to song, and performed with an excellence unequaled in today's genre of new wave, sometimes puzzling sounds our ears are constantly bombarded with. The Pyles will bring you out of your seat and onto the dance floor the first time they hit a lick. So sit back, hang onto your seat, put on your dancing shoes and enjoy THE PYLES.

Kim Stone at Dick Cooper Party


Kim Stone at Dick Cooper Party


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoal Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend the Dick Cooper Annual-Day-After-Thanksgiving Party. This party is a gathering of musicians and others in the music business.
Singer/songwriter/guitarist, Kim Stone, was born in Lousiville, KY, but has lived most of her life in Decatur, AL. She has been singing and performing over 25 years. She plays guitar and sings at several venues in Decatur, AL, and is a regular performer with the 3rd Friday Downtown Decatur activities. She has performed with and is a founding member of the Florence Camerata, and she was the winner of the "Singing with the Broadway Stars" competition this past March. Kim was selected to sing a solo with Broadway greats - Danny Zolli, Carter Calvert, Andrea Rivette, Ted Levy, and Robert DuSold. Kim also performs in various community theater productions, benefits, parties, and festivals around the North Alabama area. Most recently, she was a lead in the Zodiac Player's production of "The Great American Trailer Park Musical" in Florence, AL. She also has been featured several times on the Cookie Logic show.

Sunday, December 30, 2012

Tosha Hill at Dick Cooper Party


Tosha Hill at Dick Cooper Party

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoal Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend Dick Cooper Annual-Day-After-Thanksgiving Party. This is a gathering of musicians, old and young alike. Tosha Hill performed for the first time. This young lady is natural and unassuming with talent that will make her an important part of Alabama's music future.

Tosha Brooke Hill born ( February 15, 1993) is an American Gospel Singer, from Florence, AL. In December of 2008, she recorded her first album entitled “Sweet Holy Spirit”. She is the daughter of Billy and Tina Hill, furniture manufacturers from Florence, AL. She has three brothers, Billy Hill Jr., Josh Hill, and Caleb Hill. Tosha was raised in church all of her life and always loved to sing. When Tosha was twelve years old, she surrendered her life to Jesus Christ. Ever since that day, she’s had the burning desire to serve Him and minister to others through song. She started singing at other surrounding churches at the age of 12. One of the first venues she sung at was Restoration Ranch in Tuscumbia, AL., which is a rehab facility that ministers to individuals that have addictions through the Word of God. When Tosha was in the 8th grade she sung “Hold Me While I Cry” ,won her school’s first talent show in March of 07’. Five months later she entered into a talent competition at Mug.Com in Muscle Shoals, AL. In September, she took home the title of Shoals Star II. In that same month she competed in the North Alabama State Fair and took home 2nd place in 07’ and in 08’. She also performed at the “Halloween Hoot” in Decatur, AL in October of 07’. Being a member of Waterloo High School’s Beta Club, she represented the group in Birmingham, AL by performing solo in the special talent competition, which was held at the Birmingham Jefferson Civic Center, in Birmingham, AL. She took home Runner Up 07’-08’. April 15th she recorded two songs at Fame Studio in Muscle Shoals, AL which can be heard on the radio. In June of 2008, she had the honor to sing at Mayor Bobby Irons Campaign, not once but on two occasions. One at Petersville Community Center, but also at the Florence Coliseum. The Mayor and his wife Sarah Irons, have become one of Tosha’s best friends. July 4th of 2008, Tosha performed at Double Head Resort, in Town Creek, AL, in the talent show entitled “Star Spangled Spectacular” in the adult group and took home 2nd place. Also, in July 08‘, Tosha was thrilled to sing for the very first time at the historic W.C. Handy Festival in Tuscumbia, AL, and she opened the show for singer/songwriter Donnie Fritts. December 2008, Tosha and her brothers, Josh and Caleb, performed at the Florence Colisuem for Sara Lee’s Christmas Party, which roughly 700 attended. Tosha is special friends with singer/songwriter Earl “Peanutt” Montgomery. Peanutt wrote several songs for Country singers such as: George Jones, Tammy Wynette, Emmylou Harris, and Tanya Tucker. Tosha has done some recording with him in the past. In the future, Tosha will record one of his original songs called, “One of these Days”, He gave his life to the Lord in the early 1970’s. He felt the call to preach the good news and write Gospel songs like Ole’ Mose and co writer with Sue Richards on “Let’s all Go Down to the River”. On May 15th 2009, Tosha had the honor to meet Mike McGuire, drummer and singer/songwriter, for the American Country Group, Shenandoah, at Sunbright Care Nursing Home singing event. She also met singer Kerry Gilbert, creator of the impressive KGB Band based in the Russellville, AL area. Tosha and her brother Josh performed at Marvin Morrow’s, “Singing on the Farm”, in Cypress Inn, TN on May 28th, 2009. Tosha has also had the honor to sing on two occasions with Marvin Morrow. Marvin traveled and played with American Singers such as Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper, Merle Haggard, Tex Ritter, Ernie Ashworth, Dave Dudley, George Morgan, Hank Locklin. Marvin is such a great Christian Singer and also a good friend of the Hill family. On April 25, 2009, Tosha had the honor to sing at the Robert Jones Trent Golf Course in Colbert County for the 23rd Annual Randy Owen Celebrity Golf Course Tournament. Randy was the lead singer of the American Country group, “Alabama“. She sung with Randy’s band on “Wayfaring Stranger”, and also played Randy’s guitar. Tosha was in competition at the historic “Alabama Music Hall of Fame” . It was called the Talent Expo and she won 1st place with Peanutt Montgomery’s song, “One of These Days”. She has performed numerous times for three years at UBN television stations in: Adamsville, TN, Booneville, MS, and Russellville, AL, now. Also on WRMG Red Bay television station in Red Bay, AL. She was interviewed in year 2008 by the Christian radio station Fix 91.3 FM in Florence, AL, by Mark Allen. She was interviewed by Jerry Edgil former D.J. of WBTG, located in Muscle Shoals, AL. Also, WKAX Kickin’ Country, Russellville, AL by D.J. Buddy Mattheus in May of 2009. She has sung at numerous churches across the Tennessee Valley and neighboring states. Her and her family attends Christ Chapel in Petersville, AL, where Tosha often sings. She also sings at Revivals, Youth Rallies, Nursing Homes, Campaigns, Weddings, Anniversaries, and any other special event.

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Taylor S Hoch at Dick Cooper Party


Taylor S Hoch at Dick Cooper Party


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Shoal Creek near Florence, Alabama to attend Dick Cooper's Day-After-Thanksgiving-Party 2012. Singer/songwriter Taylor S. Hoch was on hand to perform her song, "Everywhere Else."
Taylor's been in this studio in Sheffield, AL this September for that good 'ol Muscle Shoals sound with legendary producer and engineer Jerry Masters (48 Gold/Platinums), his beautiful and talented wife, Jan, and fellow engineer, Jimmy Nutt, recording her new album (name to be released once the editing is complete). Also playing on her album are legends like David Hood on bass and Will McFarlane on lead guitar. Eddie Russell performed percussion, Opie Stewart on harp and backup vocals,  Andrew Sharpe on piano, and many more dedicated and talented artists.

It's Official! Taylor and the band!
Jason "Opie" Stewart on harp and backup vocals
Jerry Masters on Bass and sound engineer
Taylor-songwriter, singer and playing Liz
Eddie Russell on drums and percussion
"Dr." Jay Jernigan on lead guitar and backup vocals

Out of the Blue, is now available!

An artist who's been through enough to write a thousand songs but was denied the chance, Taylor Hoch was told she'd never walk again or for that matter play guitar. Today she smiles, and will happily walk up to you to start a conversation while carrying her guitar between gigs. She frequents the Huntsville area music scene selecting from a plethora of newly crafted melodic euphony that only a dulcet weathered voice can echo. The kind of folk music where no emollient exists to cure the bumps her simplistic chords and deep echoing lyrics will leave behind on your skin.

Join her for a moment, open your heart and try to fathom how her voice couldn't betray the depth of still halcyon emotion flowing through her veins.

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Backstage with Wet Willie


Backstage with Wet Willie at the Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the historic Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama to attend the performances of Wet Willie and Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. They played for the Alabama Blues Project Benefit.
Background music: Wet Willie Track 1, Shame, Shame, Shame from Left Coast Live Album

WET WILLIE began as a thrown together blues-rock band during the magical Summer of 1969 "way down in Alabama"...(Mobile, to be precise). The original nucleus of the group that eventually became known as Wet Willie was called Fox. The first "gig" was a booking in Panama City, Florida at a club called the Oddessy, a geodesic dome right on the beach. For those who must have a concept, or reason and meaning behind every occurring work in any medium of art, the only one I can think of was "fun". Raw, hormonal...fun. This video is dedicated to Wet Willie and all who were associated with the band, which continues to perform today around the Southeast.

Monday, December 24, 2012

Horse Pens 40



Horse Pens 40 


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Horse Pens 40 to attend Jam For Duane 2012 near Steele, Alabama. This is an annual event that honors Duane Allman. 
 Horse pens 40 is a historic outdoor nature park, a natural wonderland of unique rock formations nestled atop Chandler Mountain in the foothills of the Appalachians. Located on top of the third highest mountain in Alabama at 1500' above sea level, it is blessed with a moderate climate that allows everyone to enjoy it's beauty year-round. The stone formations here are said to be among the oldest naturally exposed stones in the world, dating from 600 million to 1.3 billion years old.
   There are over 60 rare, threatened, protected, or endangered species in the park, and because of this, our goal is to protect all native species here as if they are an endangered species.
 
NOTE: Due to it's very fragile ecosystem, HP40 is a "LEAVE NO TRACE" nature park and all guests are expected to do no damage to anything while they are here. No level of damage to any plant, creature, or natural feature here is acceptable or willingly tolerated.
 
There has been over 15,000 years of human habitation in the natural rock shelters located in the park. Humans have used this area as a place of sanctuary and spiritual renewal for many thousands of years, and continue to do so to this day. The park also contains ancient Indian burial grounds dating from the earliest inhabitants of this area, all the way up to the time of the Cherokee removal known as the "Trail of Tears". The Creek and Cherokee tribes at various times used the natural rock formations to trap and corral horses, as a natural fortress in times of war, and as a shelter and ceremonial area in times of peace. (The only Peace Treaty ever signed between the Creek and Cherokee nations was signed here at Horse Pens 40).
    During the War of Northern Aggression, the folks from the lowlands brought their children, horses, possessions, and valuables here to hide them from both the Yankee invaders and the Confederate recruiters and 'Bushwhackers'. Discovered by the Confederates, it was then used for storage of supplies to be distributed to Confederate troops as they passed nearby. These rocks also contain several outlaw hideouts which were used for many years. The famous Alabama outlaw Rube Burrow had a hideout here, complete with a stable, hidden passages, and a secret stone door to allow for escape if necessary.

In the 1880's, the area was settled by a young couple named Hyatt, who had come here from Georgia. The original deed refers to "the home 40, the farming 40, and the horse pens 40", each tract consisting of 40 acres of land. This is how Horse Pens 40 got it's name. Descendants of the original Hyatt family still occupy nearby areas of the mountain, and we consider ourselves blessed to have them as neighbors and friends.
Around 1958, a newspaperman from Huntsville named Warren Musgrove discovered the acoustic quality of the natural amphitheater and developed the park as a venue for Bluegrass and Southern Gospel Music concerts, as well as local arts and crafts fairs, and other activities. In the early 1960's, Emmylou Harris made her first public appearance here, standing barefoot on a wooden door propped up on the rocks. (She was reportedly paid with a bowl of fruit for this performance).

   Since then, many have gotten their start here, such as Three on a String, Marty Stewart, and others. There have been many famous people to appear here, such as Charley Daniels, Ricky Scaggs, Lester Flatt, Bill Monroe, Ralph Stanley, "Doc" Watson, Norman Blake, Deacon Dan Crary, Ace Weems and the Fat Meat Boys, The Osbourne Brothers, Sam McGee, Red Clay Ramblers, and many more. During this period, the park was designated by the Alabama State Legislature as "The Home of the South's Bluegrass Music" (Ala. HJR177). It has since become known as one of the top bouldering destinations in the United States. After some hard times brought on by the mismanagement of past owners, the Schultz family bought the park in order to restore it to its former place as a natural and historical park, a world class bouldering site, and as a premere venue for various special events, concerts, and bouldering competitions.
 
 
We look forward to welcoming you to historic Horse Pens 40 and will do everything we can to make your stay a pleasant and memorable one. Hope to see you soon!
 
          
    Come and enjoy the astounding rock formations, the rare plants and animals, and the serenity and clean air atop the mountain at Horse Pens 40!
   The Schultz family and the Staff and Friends of Horse Pens 40 cordially invite you to come and enjoy the beauty of Nature and the great outdoors with us. Everyone is welcome to come walk the beautiful trails among the unique and amazing rock formations that gave Horse Pens 40 it's worldwide fame, while listening to the birds and enjoying the solitude and inner peace that can only be found up here on the mountain in the special place known as Horse Pens 40. Bring your picnic lunch or dine in our Country Restaurant which is open Friday thru Sunday. Both RV and primitive camping is available, with bathhouses, hot water showers, huge 50' x 120' covered pavilion, water and elec. hookups, and Country Store and Restaurant on site.
 

Sunday, December 23, 2012

NC Thurman with The Decoys at MSMA Party


NC Thurman with The Decoys at MSMA Christmas Party 2012


Alabama Music Office.com goes down on the river in Sheffield, Alabama to attend the Muscle Shoals Music Association's Christmas Party 2012 at Cypress Moon Studios. This video features NC Thurman singing about New Orleans with The Decoys plus Larry Bonham.
NC (Noble Clark) Thurman grew up in Pulaski Tennessee, where he started playing in bands back in the sixties. He plays keyboards, guitar, harmonica, writes and vocalizes.

He has performed with such artists as Bettye Swann, The Forrester Sisters, The Amazing Rhythm Aces, Hank Williams Jr, Gregg Allman, Jimmy Hall, Little Richard, Billy Dean, Percy Sledge, Donnie Fritts, Billy Swan, and Eddie Floyd to name a few.

He has played on recording sessions with the likes of Roger Hawkins, David Hood, Kelvin Holly, Larry Byrom, Will McFarlane, Bob Wray, Russell Smith, Jack Pearson, Chuck Leavell, Tony Joe White, Butch Trucks, Robert Byrne and more.

He has worked with legendary producers like Rick Hall, Dann Penn, Johnny Sandlin, and Jimmy Johnson.

NC shares a nice body of songs written with Scott Boyer, some recorded by Gregg Allman, Jimmy Hall, Johnny Jenkins, Neal McCoy, Chuck Levell, and more.
He also has songs written with Eddie Struzick, Nancy Muse, Roger Hawkins, Donnie Fritts, Spooner Oldham, Terry Skinner, Ken Bell, Kelvin Holly, Tonya Holly, and more. His main gig these days is his own music and playing with his long time compadres The Decoys, Gary Nichols, Max Russell,and more. He also plays on recording sessions and artist showcases.

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Frank Brown International Songwriters Festival


Snapshots of some familiar faces at Frank Brown International Songwriters Festival.


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the Gulf Shores, Alabama to attend the Frank Brown Songwriters Festival in 2008. This is some highlights of this outstanding event. The background music is by Tommy Talton with his song "Electric Mood."
During this festival, Grammy Award winning songwriters and the up and coming stars of tomorrow come into the spotlight to perform original songs in multiple locations in beautiful Perdido Key and Pensacola, Florida and  Orange Beach and Gulf Shores, Alabama.  Festival attendees enjoy an up close and personal concert experience and are often able to learn the stories behind the songs as told by the original author.  Venues of all kinds welcome the nearly 200 songwriters that come from around the country and around the world.  Whether you are looking for a "listening room" experience, a pleasant dinner and music venue, a family friendly musical adventure or a gritty roadhouse,FBISF has a place for you.  Most venues are free to attend, a few charge a modest cover at the door.
The 2013 Festival will be held November 7 - 17, 2013

Thursday, December 20, 2012

JK Terrell Interview


JK Terrell Interview 

Alabama Music Office.com goes through the door into our studios to interview
JK Terrell November 2012. Below is a reprint of an interview I did with JK which 
was published in Planet Weekly March 2007.


An Interview with J.K. Terrell

  by Jerry W. Henry


Do you want to tell us what the J.K. stands for?
Most people I tell it stands for Just Kidding! I come from an old southern family that used initials. It stand for James Kenneth.
Where are you from?
I was born in Birmingham, raised and educated in Mobile, and been in Tuscaloosa a large portion of my life. I’m a true Alabamian.
You are a accomplished musician. Where did it all begin?
There was always a set of drums in the closet in our house. The failed instruments from one of my brothers. I came from a large family with two brothers and two sisters. There was always a old marching drum in the closet. I would sneak into the closet and beat on it and no one could really hear it. But I think as far as being influenced, it was being lucky enough to be born in the  50’s and surviving the 60’s. I had the joy of listening to Elvis and the Beatles. There was always music in the house. But I am the only one in my family that actually plays an instrument. But everybody in the family loved music. We revered the musicians, they were our role models, more than the athletes of the day. I remember my parents were big fans of Al Hirt and Pete Fountain. They liked that New Orleans kind of jazz that they could dance to. I had big sisters that listened to the 50’s rock and roll from Bill Haley to the Big Bopper. There was a lot of Buddy Holly in our house also. When I came along and could afford to buy 45 RPM records. I bought the Beatles, Led Zepplin, Jimi Hendrix and all those from the psychedelic age. I was blessed with a family that loved music and loved to dance.

What was your first band?
In high school people would get together. I was in a gang down in a certain part of Mobile. We were  the first long hairs in our school. We were the first to get instruments and learn to play them. In high school there were eight or nine guys that floated through this house that had a set of drums and guitars. All of us were allowed to play. So it might be three or four guys one day and the next day a whole different group. Some identified with drums, some identified with bass, and some with guitars. The first band that made any money was a band called Full Moon. That was a kind of jazz/blues based band that had one of the original members of Wet Willy named Wick Larsen. Topper Price was a member of that band for a short while. That was the first band that actually got paid and didn’t have to play for beer and pizza.
Where did you progress from there?
You know the blues was always attractive to a lot of us white boys back in the 70’s. We didn’t live that kind of lifestyle, nor did we witness it. Hearing that beat in the back of  psychedelia and being in Mobile which was such a great blues town made for a natural attraction. A lot of great blues bands came through there played places like the Harlem Duke Social Club, the Mardi Gras Club and the black clubs in Pritchard. They would let us come and listen. I can remember Albert King playing there and there were more young white musicians than black folks. Albert liked that because us white boys bought a lot of drinks. We didn’t sit around and nurse one drink all night. We drank a lot and were good tippers. Wanting to play rock and roll influenced by the blues got me to Florida touring both coast in a pretty good band. They were a bunch of hometown boys from Port Charlotte and Fort Myers that had a lot of connections and were already working.
What was the name of that band?
That band was HatTrick. Those guys are still playing. One of my best friends and the lead singer for HatTrick just released a CD  called Old Humble Men that got picked up by a small label in Miami.
      I left rock and roll when I was in grad school here in Tuscaloosa. I became a redneck in a soul band. I was a white drummer in a 12-piece black soul band. That was like getting my graduate degree in music. The horn section was all the top players from Stillman. The leader of the horn section was music director at Stillman. They were all very high quality musicians in that band. We did shows and you had to learn timings. We had two different singers in three different shows. I was the drummer in that band. Then I was in a splinter group that came off that band that had a great drummer so I played percussion. That’s what got me playing congas and tembalies and the whole percussion thing.
You played with Johnny Shines. Didn’t you?
I was blessed by accidentally running into Johnny Shines via his wife Hattie. She worked at Partlow where I was working. She was a  housekeeper there in the building I worked in. She and I got to talking. She told me to come over to her house one night to meet her husband and eat some catfish. I was really more out to get a free meal than to meet anybody. It turned out that the night I went over there Robert Junior Lockwood was passing through. He and Johnny were on their way to Jacksonville, Florida to do some gigs promoting their latest album. They needed a place to rehearse because Robert was coming down from Cleveland and Johnny had not rehearsed with band. I had a full studio in this room we are sitting in now. We used to record in here. I had a full set of drums, percussion, amps, everything, a full studio. I said, “guys just come to my house and rehearse.” They asked, “how much it would cost.” I said, “My gosh, nothing. Just come over. I’d like to hear you play.” So about one o’clock one afternoon, Robert Junior Lockwood, Johnny Shines and Robert’s band from Cleveland came over to my house  here and played. At that time one of Robert’s stepsons was trying to play percussion. He was having difficulty playing this one song. In an attempt to help him figure out a beat I started playing congas. Robert told his stepson to sit down. I started playing and they asked me to go to Jacksonville with them. I couldn’t go to Jacksonville with them because I was already on schedule the next night. They were going to leave that next night and I couldn’t just pack up and go. They asked me if I could join them in Jacksonville, Alabama and do some shows going back up north when they came back from Jacksonville, Florida. I worked it out were I could. They were just getting ready to record their second album. It was actually Robert Lockwood that asked me to join them in the studio in Boston to record. We had three or four months to get ready to record. I started doing some shows with Johnny and we became very good friends. That was the start of a long and good relationship with Johnny  Shines and Robert Lockwood.
What came next?
I went from the blues to the only reggae band in Alabama, Lost in The Mail. I was with that band for seven years. I was an original member. I kind of bounced around after that for awhile. I was in a band called Beanland out of Oxford, Mississippi for awhile. I met them through Lost in The Mail playing in Oxford. We had a good following in Oxford. A couple of the guys in Beanland, Lance Lawrence which became my very good friend and roommate was a bartender in this bar we played at called Forrester’s. They all loved reggae music and it turned out this guitar player named Bill McCrory worked as a bartender there also. Playing there they knew me before I knew them.
      Then later on a buddy of mine here in Tuscaloosa called me and said Beanland was playing that night here and wanted to go sit in with them. They were staying at Dill’s Motor Court. So we went down asked if they would mind if we sat in with them on a couple of songs. I didn’t know it but they were having some problems with their drummer. We went down to The Tusk that night. I set up my percussion rig. I didn’t know if I was going to play one song or how many or if I would get to play at all. I ended up playing the whole night from the first song to the last song. The place was packed. Everything seemed to fall into place that night. Their drummer played the best he had in a long time. It was a great night. I just went there to sit in and have a good time. After the gig they walked up and placed a big stack of cash in my hand. They said I deserved it and wanted to know if I could come and join them in Memphis the next weekend. Then it was Nashville and I was still with them three months later. So one night we were at the Nick, which is the place I have played the most. The Nick and the old Wooden Nickel were the places I played with the Southside Blues Band and Lost in The Mail. Anyway, Beanland was playing the Nick when they asked me to come on board with them because they were about to record and wanted me to be a part of it. So I ended up moving to Oxford and traveled with Beanland for a couple of years — recorded their first CD with them. Did a DVD. We still do a reunion ever so often.
      I did a tour with the John Kilzer Band with the great Memphis drummer Harry Peel who was with Beanland also. We were signed to Geffen and I went from $100,000 a year to $50.00 a night plus a bowl of chili gigs in 48 hours. All because of a drunk saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. But that’s the music business.
Is that when you moved back to Tuscaloosa?
Yea, I came back and at times have been with four bands at one time. I did a 10 year stint with Mike Spiller, Michael and the Memories. Which is a wonderful family band. They were great people to work for and fun to be with. They treated me like  family.
      I was in a band called the Persuaders with Dan Vogt, and Gary Walker. I was in a band called The Flying Leroys with Gary Edmonds, Mike Shamblin, and Chris Ballard. I’ve worked with the Alabama Blues Project for about eight or nine years now. I’ve been involved with the musical staff at the Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Birmingham for a little over four years. It’s the oldest African American Baptist in Birmingham. I don’t think I stumbled into that church, I feel I was led there. Those are as high a quality musicians as I have ever played with. There ain’t no sad walkin and slow singing in this church. It’s uptempo. Some of the guys have degrees in music, some are full time jazz musicians, there’s a couple of high school band directors as choir directors. It’s been a learning experience for me, learning the business of gospel music. Muddy Waters said the blues had a baby and they called it rock and roll. I really think gospel had a baby and  they called it the blues. I think it all came out of the spiritual, and the field shouting from the slave days. Johnny Shines taught me that the field shouting was the way they got the news from one plantation to the other. Then when the masters got wise to what they were doing they started disguising the news by singing. As they got Christianized, the songs came into the church. The gospel business is all above the table business, none of that under the table money stuff. From a musician’s stand point there are more churches than bars in Alabama. You don’t have to play until three in the morning and breath second hand smoke. It’s great for me.
      I’m doing studio projects, a gospel album, and have been working with Mike Mysinger helping him get his original tunes out. Mike’s project is with Dan Vogt and Bruce Hopper. I am always getting calls to go play someplace. But now a days I am very selective.

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Patterson Hood Sings Eddie Hinton at MSMA Party



Patterson Hood Sings Eddie Hinton at MSMA Christmas Party 2012


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Cypress Moon Studios in Sheffield, Alabama to attend the Muscle Shoals Music Association Christmas Party December 18, 2012. In this video Patterson Hood sings Eddie Hinton's "Everybody Needs Love."

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa #13 The Finale


Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa #13 The Finale


This is the final video in this series videoed at the historic Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Wet Willie and Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims entertained for this Alabama Blues Project Benefit. Thanks, we have had thousands of views by you and expect more in the future.

THE WET WILLIE BAND- As a legion of fans will attest, Wet Willie was perhaps the hardest rocking of all the 70s era Southern Rock bands, after the Allmans and Lynyrd Skynyrd. The band issued an enviable array of rollicking, high energy, soulful blues-rock classics, including the national chart-topping anthem Keep On Smilin. ---- Today Wet Willie continues to excite fans with their live performances, and they appear live in two distinct formats: The Wet Willie Band consists of original members Jack Hall on bass, John Anthony ..boards, T.K. Lively on the drums, and Jacks sister Donna D Hall on vocals and harmonies. Ric Seymour, with the band for over a decade plays guitar and handles lead and backing vocals, while Ricky Chancey plays blues harp and guitar. ---- When scheduling permits, original lead vocalist Jimmy Hall appears, and the band is billed as Wet Willie, featuring Jimmy Hall. ---- In 1969 Wet Willie got together in Mobile behind the powerful vocals, sax and harp of Jimmy Hall, with his brother Jack on bass. Ricky Hirsch played lead guitar, John Anthony was on the keys, and Lewis Ross was the drummer. Early influences included the Stones, Animals and Taj Mahal, but their sound was closer in spirit to early Otis Redding or Little Richard- which made their move to Macon, Ga in 1970 a natural one. After all, Macon was the hometown of Redding and Richard, as well as the headquarters of newly-formed Capricorn Records. Wet Willie auditioned for Capricorn and were hard at work on their debut album by the Fall of the same year. ---- In contrast to Capricorn label-mates the Allman Brothers and Marshall Tuckers long guitar jams, Wet Willie was steeped in sweaty, good-time R&B- a potent gumbo of soulful rock and funky rhythm and blues with fiery vocals that helped define Southern Rock. ---- The band went on to release six albums for Capricorn, including Drippin Wet, recorded live in New Orleans, which perhaps best captured Wet Willies energetic live show. Their fourth release, Keep On Smilin gave them a hit with the title track. The addition of the Williettes, featuring sister Donna Hall, enhanced the groups sound further with a gospel and soul sensibility. Other popular tracks recorded during their Capricorn years include Countryside of Life, Leona and Dixie Rock. ---- In 1978 Wet Willie reformed with a new line-up and a contract with Epic Records. Founding brothers Jimmy and Jack Hall were joined by additional members Mike Duke ..boards, drummer T.K. Lively, and guitarists Larry Berwald and Marshall Smith. The Epic albums, Manorisms and Which Ones Willie? yielded two more chart hits- Streetcorner Serenade and Weekend. ---- After pursuing other interests in the 1980s, Wet Willie re-emerged in the 90s and started accepting select concert dates around the Southeast. In 1990 the band was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, and in March of 2001 was also honored by the Alabama Music Hall of Fame.

Brad Quin Interview


Brad Quin Interview


Alabama Music Office.com goes through the door into our studios to video Brad Guin.
Brad Guin aka Bad Brad is an old road dog that paid his dues for over 20 years playing sideman and studio musician for such acts as Eddie Floyd, Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, The Temptations, Paul Shaffer, Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit, The Four Tops, The O'Jays, Greg Allman, Little Milton, Clarence Carter, Buddy Miles, Percy Sledge, Dr. Hook, Tony Joe White, Bonnie Bramlett, T. Graham Brown, Jimmy Hall, Martha and the Vandellas, Fame Studios, Muscle Shoals Sound Studios Horn Section, The Nutt House Studios Horn Section, Emerald Studios, Travis Wammack, Jimmie Johnson, Rick Hall, Wayne Perkins, The Decoys, Jim Nabors, Cornell Dupree, The Muscle Shoals Horns, The Tuscaloosa Horns, The North Mississippi All Stars, David Kimbrough, Musical Fantasy, Rick Carter's League of Legendary Artists (LOLA), Frankie Velvet and the Veltones, Erin Mitchell and many more, as well as many all-star special events bands such as The Alabama Music Hall of Fame Induction Band, The Muscle Shoals Soul Revue.

Brad has been there and done that as far as life in the music business goes. He has played with hundreds of bands at every possible level and in every scenario. His experience as a player is vast, and his education has come from the great legends of the music industry. Brad has played some of the most illustrious venues in the world: Austin City Limits, The Apollo Theatre, all the Blue Note Clubs in Japan, the star-studded opening of Euro Disney as well as more major festivals than can be remembered, plus the finest theaters and amphitheatres that each major city has to offer. Saying that he is a seasoned pro would be an understatement.

Brad has returned to Tuscaloosa, Alabama where it all began for him. His return brought time to perfect his songwriting. "I consider songwriting to be as much of who I am as my ability as a player. It's as much of who I am, if not more," says Brad. "I love telling stories. I always wanted to cut a record of original material, but I had envisioned a far more instrumental endeavor for one reason. I did not know I could sing. I had no idea. I only started experiencing it after being around Bobby Whitlock, keyboard for Derek & The Dominoes. We would be hanging out drinking coffee, he would sing, and it would come from his toenails. It was awesome. And it was nothing like his speaking voice. I would get in the car after hanging with him and try to do it. It took several years of 'doing it' before I would even attempt it in front of anyone."

"I had all these songs written, and nothing to do with them. I finally wanted to try my hand at producing. I called all my most bad-to-the-bone friends to do a session in the Shoals: Buster Marbury (Grammy award-winning producer and drummer for The Temptations, who flew in from Detroit), Jason Isbell, Ken Waters, Jimbo Hart of the 400 Unit, Greg Lowery, Scott Boyer III, Shane Porter, Chris Gordon, Chad Fisher and Dan Western. I traded a Fender Rhodes piano to my friend Jimmy Nutt for three days in his new Sheffield, Alabama studio, The Nutt House."

"When I cut the vocals, it shocked everyone that knows me, and it has been a wonderful experience arguing with everyone that knows me that it really is me singing on the album. It's Jim Nabors syndrome, because I am country as a turnip green, and I sing like an old black man. That comes from years of passionately listening to Stax, Muscle Shoals, High Records, Motown, Ray Charles, the Philadelphia stuff, the Macon, Georgia stuff and piles of New Orleans music. I can't sing white unless it's country-oriented."

"I grew up so very country on the edge of the Sipsey Swamp. Across the cotton field from my house, bluegrass raged every weekend at least one night if not two, and sometimes all daylong. So, my influences are a culmination of all things southern."
Brad has always had a passion for music. He learned to play the saxophone in the band at Northside High School. He had an excellent band instructor, Roger Mills, who directly and indirectly inspired him to play his sax 7 to 10 hours a day. He and Roger are still friends. Roger now owns Cole Band Instruments in Northport, Alabama. Brad followed his music path to the University of North Alabama where session work soon became plentiful. Then came the life of a sideman on the road. He has come full circle now and has the chops to do what ever he wants. What he wants is to play you his songs that he does so very, very well. Folks, look back over the list of super pros Brad has played for. It stands to reason that over that time Brad became a pro. In other words, he is a 'bad' sax player. Truth be known, Brad Guin just might be the baddest of the baddest. You owe it to yourself and Southern music in general to experience, Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. Yep, Bad 'Bama' Brad Guin is an Alabama frontman to watch.

Published December 2012 issue of Tannehill Trader

Monday, December 17, 2012

Bad Brad "Bayou Skankin"


Bad Brad "Bayou Skankin"


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the historic Bama Theatre in downtown Tuscaloosa, Alabama to see Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims and Wet Willie play for Alabama Blues Project Benefit September 2012.
Brad Guin is a phenomenal saxophone player who has been hitting the stage and studio with some of the biggest names in the music industry since the ripe age of 17 when he performed with The Four Tops and The Temptations in France.

Between then and now, he has been a saxophone player for: Duane Allman, Bobby Blue Band, B.B. King, The Ojays, Clarence Carter, Little Milton, Tony Joe White, Bonnie Bramlett, Bobby Whitlock of Derek & The Dominos, T. Graham Brown, Percy Sledge, Johnny Taylor, Dennis Locorriere of Dr. Hook, Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit, Martha & The Vandellas, Jim Neighbors, The Muscle Shoals Horns, Travis Wammack, Cornell Dupree, Freddy Hart, Dennis Edwards, The Alabama Music Hall of Fame Induction Band. Guin has also been employed by Muscle Shoals Sound Studios and FAME Studios as a session player and arranger.

Guin has graced dozens of the most famed stages across the world, such as the The Apollo Theater, all The Blue Note Jazz Clubs in Japan, House of Blues across the U.S. and even Aretha Franklin's house for her birthday party one year. As a side man for major acts, he has played nearly every major theater and festival in the country.

To say Guin is a seasoned professional is like saying Mike Tyson is halfway decent boxer. He now adds to his list of accomplishments his first album as a producer.

Guin decided in 2011 to take his vast experience and start his own band, Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. All songs of the debut album "Slim Pickins" are written and co-written by Guin. And to the shock and awe of his friends and colleagues, he can really sing, which is something he had never done before and his own family didn't know he could. His voice is now being compared to the likes of Al Green, Otis Redding, Ray Charles, Jimmy Hughes, Eddie Hinton and Sam Moore. Nobody is more surprised than him.
Description
We are an original retro soul band from Alabama who's music will catch you with your pants down. If I had to call it anything, I would call it a hybrid between retro soul and art rock, but it is so mostly retro soul. Whatever it is, it's southern as #*&!.
Band Interests
Gigging and Recording
Artists We Also Like
The Alabama Shakes, Anything off of the Dap Tone label, in particular the Dap Kings, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Amy Winehouse, Adele, Mark Ronson, Sea Sick Steve

Sunday, December 16, 2012

2BLU and The Lucky Stiffs-Interview


2BLU and The Lucky Stiffs-Interview


Alabama Music Office.com goes through the door into our studio to interview 2BLU and The Lucky Stiffs. They were in town as headliners for Alabama Blues Project's 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues. John Scalici sat in for James Dudley on the drum kit that night. In the title I listed a song "Walk In Peace." That song is not included in this video. Scroll down to the previous post. I posted "Walk In Peace" as it was performed at the Alabama Blues Project's 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues. Enjoy and listen to the song's message.

2BLU & The Lucky Stiffs is an Alabama blues band with a long and accomplished history.
2011 Judged Alabama's Best Unsigned Blues Duo, Magic City Blues Society
2010 Semi Finalist, IBC Blues Challenge, Memphis
2009 Judged Alabama's Best Unsigned Blues Band, Magic City Blues Society
2007 Semi Finalist and FINALIST, IBC Blues Competition, Acoustic Duo, Memphis
2007 Judged Alabama's best Unsigned Acoustic Blues Duo
2003 Judged Alabama's best Unsigned Acoustic Blues Duo
2003 Semi Finalist, IBC Blues Competition, Memphis
2002 Judged Alabama's Best Unsigned Blues Band; Semi Finalist, IBC Blues Competition, Memphis

From a former interview:
What's The Music Like In General?
"We call it a premium blend of blues, rock, funk and gospel. In the context of a show, we perform in three formats. Acoustic duo or trio, unplugged four piece and five piece electric band. When performing acoustically, the tunes are closer to a Delta Blues style with original twists added.
When performing "electrified" we produce a blend of blues, funk and rock. We consider ourselves influenced by many artists. To name a few; Little Feat, Stevie Ray, reverend Gary Davis, Elmore Jones, Lowell Fulson and of course Ray Charles. Our tunes are mostly original with some adaptations and covers of our liking thrown in."

The Players

Bruce Andrews -- Harmonica and Lead Vocals

George Dudley -- Guitars and Vocals

Jack Dudley -- Bass and Vocals

Dave Gowens -- Percussion

James Dudley -- Drums

Saturday, December 15, 2012

2BLU and the Lucky Stiffs "Walk In Peace"


2BLU and the Lucky Stiffs "Walk In Peace"


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues at Hotel Capstone on the campus of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This was a fundraiser for the Alabama Blues Project whose mission is the preservation of blues music. Naked Tater Blues Band performed along with Simple Interest, Alabama Blues Project Advanced Band and headliner 2BLU & The Lucky Stiffs.
2BLU and The Lucky Stiffs have been providing fans with their premium blend of blues, rock, funk, and gospel for years. Whether they are putting their original twists on Delta Blues when performing in an unplugged acoustic duo or trio, or bringing the funk in their electrified four- or five-piece configuration, 2BLU And The Lucky Stiffs create their own unique brew to rock your bones and soothe your soul.
The genesis of the band was the acoustic duo of Bruce Andrews and George Dudley, who adopted the name "2BLU". With the addition of drums, bass, and percussion, the boys become "2BLU and The Lucky Stiffs".
Why the name? The guys are "Lucky" to share a mix of music, faith, and life experience with anyone who will listen. On top of that, they're a bunch of "Stiffs," old, old dudes who can't quit playing and wouldn't dream of quitting in the first place.
2BLU's lyrical approach frequently reflects the band's Christian faith, usually in a non-traditional format, mixing secular and Faith themes in their tunes; exactly as life mixes the everyday grind with the divine. This combination represents the roots of the Blues.
Diverse instrumentation includes custom hand-built lap steel guitars, bass guitars and hand percussion by bassist Jack Dudley of Don't Fret Instruments.

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Alabama Blues Project 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues Highlights

Alabama Blues Project 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues Highlights


Alabama Music Office.com goes to the 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues at Hotel Capstone on the campus of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This was a fundraiser for the Alabama Blues Project whose mission is the preservation of blues music. Naked Tater Blues Band performed along with Simple Interest, Alabama Blues Project Advanced Band and headliner 2BLU & The Lucky Stiffs.
This is some highlights with the intention of introducing you to these Alabama blues bands.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Naked Tater Blues Band


Naked Tater Blues Band

Alabama Music Office.com goes to the 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues at Hotel Capstone on the campus of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This was a fundraiser for the Alabama Blues Project whose mission is the preservation of blues music. Naked Tater Blues Band performed along with Simple Interest, Alabama Blues Project Advanced Band and headliner 2BLU & The Lucky Stiffs.

The "Naked Tater Blues Band" was formed by three guys (Ivan Walker, Tim 'Rerun" Green, Jeremy Manion) who got together to jam once a week to satisfy their blues tooth. Very quickly they realized this trio had to be more than a once a week jam band. As the band began to get out and play it wasn't long till others were also moved by the soulful blues of Naked Tater and the band grew from there. In 2012 a fourth member has been added "Steve Bartlett" that has completed the shake your bones and move your soul sound of the Naked Tater Blues Band. Our mantra is that we hope the music moves you as much as it does us!!!
Four soulful southern guys playing the blues as smooth as a "Naked Tater"!!! The blues, the whole blues and nothing but the blues. It doesn't matter where or for how many these guys are always ready to play the music they love so
much and share it with those that feel the same!!!

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa #12



Wet Willie in Tuscaloosa #12

 

Alabama Music Office.com goes to the historic Bama Theatre in Tuscaloosa, Alabama to attend a performance by Wet Willie and Big Brad & The SipseySlims performing for Alabama Blues Project Benefit. In this video Wet Willie tells us "If I don't love you baby, grits ain't groceries, eggs ain't poultry and Mona Lisa was a man...."


ABP Advanced Band


ABP Advanced Band


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Hotel Capstone in Tuscaloosa, Alabama to attend the 6th Annual Evening of Art & Blues. The event is the Alabama Blues Project's annual fundraiser, raising money and awareness for its award-winning after-school and summer Blues Camps.
The Alabama Blues Project teaches music through award winning blues programs, and these are its elite students. Inspired by classic blues and adding a fountain of youth, they perform covers and originals. Taylor Britten pipes heartrending vocals and is flanked by up-and-coming background singers, LaBorn Brown and Cheyna Dancer. Tyler Carter is an eclectic lead guitarist and vocalist, backed by Austin Davis' steady strums. Jonathan Blakney sings and brings harmonica genius. Bennett Limbaugh adds a funky bass, while Tasheka Spencer and Duncan King play tight percussion. Having received much praise and bookings, these young talents have also shared the stage with many blues greats including Willie King, Sam Lay, Dr. G.B. Burt, Eddie Kirkland and Bobby Rush.

Monday, December 10, 2012

International Blues Challenge


International Blues Challenge


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Memphis, TN to attend the 25th International Blues Challenge. The world's largest gathering of Blues acts represents an international search by The Blues Foundation and its Affiliated Organizations for the Blues Band and Solo/Duo Blues Act ready to take their act to the international stage.
The Blues Foundation held its 25th annual International Blues Challenge in Memphis from February 4th-7th, 2009. This year's challenge features 100 bands and 64 solo/duo acts from 36 states and 9 countries, including Canada, Australia, Israel, Italy, Norway, and, of course, the United States.
IBC winners are chosen in two categories - Blues Band and Solo/Duo Act - and the competitors are chosen by The Blues Foundation and affiliated organizations (mostly local and regional blues societies). Winners are chosen by their performances; IBC semi-final performances were held on Thursday and Friday at local Memphis clubs, and final competitions were held at The Orpheum Theatre on Saturday, February 7th.
To come out on top in the International Blues Challenge can be a real career-maker. The list of current blues artists who have participated in, or won the IBC is impressive, and includes such critical faves as Susan Tedeschi, Tommy Castro, Watermelon Slim, Jason Ricci, Albert Cummings, Eden Brent, and the late Sean Costello, among many others.
Prizes, including cash, gigs, instruments, and publicity services are awarded to the top three Blues Band and the top two Solo/Duo finalists, along with categories like "Best Guitarist" and "Best Self-Produced CD."
Blues-rock trio JP Soars and the Red Hots took first place in the Blues Band category. Sponsored by the South Florida Blues Society, Soars also took the IBC's "Best Guitarist" Awards.
Piedmont blues guitarist Little Joe McLerran earned first place for Solo/Duo with his old-school, acoustic-style approach to the country blues. Sponsored by the Blues Society of Tulsa, Little Joe is a young 24 years old chronologically, but the guitarist possesses an old soul with an undeniable blues heart. This was his fourth IBC appearance.

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Loup-Garou "Desert"


Loup-Garou "Desert"

Alabama Music Office.com goes to Rogue Tavern in downtown Birmingham, Alabama to attend a performance by Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. Opening for them was Loup-Garou, a Birmingham band with none of the members from the Magic City. Their website explains it this way: Walking the dogs……

So here is a quick auto biography of this crazy little Birmingham band.. Ian from NY was walking from one of the bars on 5 points to go up and drink beers and play music with Daniel, our Native, Indigenous member… ……….ya that’s right I said indigenous member, (he’s a true Bhamster)……. Ian see’s Albi from Germany walking his dog Tammy Faye and they start talking, quickly uncovering that Albi likes to jam…Ian says “man I’m going to a jam right now, come on lets go!!! “ …..meanwhile ………Jeremy from Louisiana and Shawna from Arkansas have got around to playing music at some of these big city Birmingham hot spots, and one night at a gig they met Matt from So Cali, who as it happens also knew Albi….. Then one chilly winters eve Albi has a party at his house, inviting all of the characters of our narrative into the warmth of his Southside flat….. ……. and that my friends is the short version of how one night in Albi’s apartment when everything clicked like a switch that Daniel Matt Jeremy Albi Shawna and Ian started making music in little ole’ Birmingham, Alabama…………..

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims "Mississippi Holiday"



Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims "Mississippi Holiday" 


Alabama Music Office.com goes to Rogue Tavern in downtown Birmingham, Alabama to attend a performance by Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims. This is a band of professionals that is making a name for themselves one gig at a time. These guys are where Southern music is today.
For 20 years, Brad Guin has covered every pig trail in the U.S. and abroad as a burning sideman and studio musician, playing with such acts as Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, Greg Allman, The Temptations, The Four Tops, The O'Jays, Clarence Carter, Little Milton, Percy Sledge, Eddie Floyd, Johnny Taylor, Tony Joe White, Bobby Whitlock, T. Graham Brown, Martha and the Vandellas, Travis Wammack, Rick Carter and the League of Legendary Artists, Cornell Dupree, Dennis Edwards, Jim Nabors, Freddy Hart, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Bonnie Bramlett, as well as many all-star special events bands such as The Alabama Music Hall of Fame Induction Band, The Muscle Shoals Soul Revue. He has played with hundreds of bands at every possible level and in every scenario. His experience as a player is vast, and his education has come from the great legends of the music industry.

Brad has played some of the most illustrious venues in the world: Austin City Limits, The Apollo Theatre, all the Blue Note Clubs in Japan, the star-studded opening of Euro Disney as well as more major festivals than you can shake a stick at, plus the finest theaters and amphitheatres that each major city has to offer. That was as a saxophone player.

To say the very least, he is a seasoned pro. As well as being a ringer musician, he is also a songwriter who considers that to be as much of who he is as his ability as a player.

"It's as much of who I am, if not more," says Brad. "I love telling stories.

In Brad's Words:

I always wanted to cut a record of original material, but I had envisioned a far more instrumental endeavor for one reason. I did not know I could sing. I had know idea. I only started experiencing it after being around Bobby Whitlock, keyboard for Derek & The Dominoes. We would be hanging out drinking coffee, he would sing, and it would come from his toenails. It was awesome. And it was nothing like his speaking voice. I would get in the car after hanging with him and try to do it. It took several years of "doing it" before I would even attempt it in front of anyone.
I had all these songs written, and nothing to do with them. I finally wanted to try my hand at producing. I called all my most bad-to-the-bone friends to do a session in the Shoals: Buster Marbury (Grammy award-winning producer and drummer for The Temptations, who flew in from Detroit), Jason Isbell, Ken Waters, Jimbo Hart of the 400 Unit, Greg Lowery, Scott Boyer III, Shane Porter, Chris Gordon, Chad Fisher and Dan Western. I traded a Fender Rhodes piano to my friend Jimmy Nutt for three days in his new Sheffield, Alabama studio, The Nutt House.

Buster Marbury heard me fooling aroung singing. He said, "You need to do that, man. You got something."

Buster passed away from cancer a short time later, but he put a seed in my head, otherwise I doubt I would have even attempted it. The whole voice thing would have never happened without Bobby Whitlock or Buster Marbury. I was so shy and secretive about developing it that my own wife and child had no idea. Nobody knew it, and it was literally many years after my time with Bobby and Buster that I hooked up with the guys in the Slims to cut the record that anyone knew about my singing.

When I cut the vocals, it shocked everyone that knows me, and it has been a wonderful experience arguing with everyone that knows me that it really is me singing on the album. It's Jim Nabors syndrome, because I am country as a turnip green, and I sing like an old black man. That comes from years of passionately listening to Stax, Muscle Shoals, High Records, Motown, Ray Charles, the Philadelphia stuff, the Macon, Georgia stuff and piles of New Orleans music. I can't sing white unless it's country-oriented.

At which point my bluegrass roots and old gospel roots come out, as well as my love of Ray Stevens and Jerry Reed. I grew up so very country on the edge of the Sipsey Swamp. Across the cotton field from my house, bluegrass raged every weekend at least one night if not two, and sometimes all day long. So, my influences are a culmination of all things southern.

Published-December 2012 Tannehill Trader

Jerry W. Henry Album Reviews
Bad Brad & The Sipsey Slims have released Slim Pickins
(self-released) with 10 songs that should propel this kick-ass group onto the big stage. This is a HOT album with every song a Muscle Shoals/Memphis influenced winner. The Sipsey Slims are: Brad Guin a.k.a. Bad Brad (Lead Vocals and Sax), Tyler Carter (Guitar), Bennett Limbaugh (Bass), David Keith (Percussion), Matt Slocum (Keys), Shane Porter (Trumpet)

Published-December 2012 Tannehill Trader



Wednesday, December 5, 2012

"Mudflap Limo" Music Video



"Mudflap Limo" Music Video 

Alabama Music Office.com makes a music video. This video started with a cross country conversation with Selma, Alabama native Gary Sparks who now resides in LA. I told him about an idea for a song. He started working on it that same day. We communicated for several weeks as the song was taking form. 
About the time the song was finished I was asked to enter a video in a contest using still photography. What you are watching is the result. We did win a Distinction Award.